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Brewster Kahle on the Internet Archive

wired:


Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…


The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.


“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.
Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

wired:

Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…

The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.

“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.

Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

(Source: Wired)

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier
Patricia Piccinini
fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  
all images © Peter Mallet 
(via Design Boom)

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier

Patricia Piccinini

fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  

all images © Peter Mallet 

(via Design Boom)

Maywa Denki

Brewster Kahle on the Internet Archive

wired:


Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…


The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.


“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.
Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

wired:

Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…

The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.

“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.

Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

(Source: Wired)

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

(Source: everything1s, via 1982)

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier
Patricia Piccinini
fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  
all images © Peter Mallet 
(via Design Boom)

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier

Patricia Piccinini

fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  

all images © Peter Mallet 

(via Design Boom)

(Source: heroinych, via whatsurdadlike)

Maywa Denki

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