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wired:


Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…


The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.


“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.
Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

wired:

Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…

The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.

“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.

Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

(Source: Wired)

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier
Patricia Piccinini
fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  
all images © Peter Mallet 
(via Design Boom)

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier

Patricia Piccinini

fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  

all images © Peter Mallet 

(via Design Boom)

Maywa Denki

Digital Handwork

ryanpanos:

Future North Korea | Via

What happens when a North Korean architect is given free rein to design what he or she likes?

Over the course of the last four years, one Beijing based tour company has sought to answer that question by asking a practicing architect from North Korea to create futuristic designs for sustainable tourism developments in the country.

Koryo Tours — which offers organized trips around North Korea — provided the anonymous participant who works at the Paektusan Architectural Institute in Pyongyang with an open brief and no limits on costs, scale or physical possibilities.

(via alwaysinstudio)

wired:


Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…


The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.


“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.
Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

wired:

Legendary Australian performance artist Stelarc is known for going to extremes, from aggressive voluntary surgeries and robotic third arms to flesh-hook suspensions and prosthetics. For more than four decades, he has used his body as a canvas for art on the very edge of human experience: He once ingested a “stomach sculpture” that could have killed him…

The long sleeves of Stelarc’s black jacket conceal the notorious “Ear on Arm” project, in which a “biocompatible scaffold” was surgically inserted into his left forearm in 2006, creating the shape of an ear in an arduous ongoing process.

“At present it’s only a relief of an ear,” Stelarc said. “When the ear becomes a more 3-D structure we’ll reinsert the small microphone that connects to a wireless transmitter.” In any Wi-Fi hotspot, he said, it will become internet-enabled. “So if you’re in San Francisco and I’m in London, you’ll be able to listen in to what my ear is hearing, wherever you are and wherever I am.”

Read more @ Underwire.

Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired

(Source: Wired)

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

continentcontinent:

East Germany showing off its computers in a state parade, 1987

(Source: everything1s, via 1982)

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier
Patricia Piccinini
fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  
all images © Peter Mallet 
(via Design Boom)

wildandpeaceful:

The Carrier

Patricia Piccinini

fibreglass, silicone, human hair, clothing  

all images © Peter Mallet 

(via Design Boom)

(Source: heroinych, via whatsurdadlike)

Maywa Denki

Digital Handwork

ryanpanos:

Future North Korea | Via

What happens when a North Korean architect is given free rein to design what he or she likes?

Over the course of the last four years, one Beijing based tour company has sought to answer that question by asking a practicing architect from North Korea to create futuristic designs for sustainable tourism developments in the country.

Koryo Tours — which offers organized trips around North Korea — provided the anonymous participant who works at the Paektusan Architectural Institute in Pyongyang with an open brief and no limits on costs, scale or physical possibilities.

(via alwaysinstudio)

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